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Dental X-rays should be avoided where;
  • The patient is pregnant.
  • The patient has been exposed to repeated exposure of the same area within a short period of time
  • The patient has received radiotherapy to the face and or jaws for the treatment of medical conditions.
  • The radiation risk is regarded as excessive for the clinical case IR(ME)R 2000
The authorative body for regulation of ionising radiation (X-rays) in dentistry is the Public Health Englad (PHE). Dental Scanning Services take safety very seriously which is why we have appointed the governing authority as our advisors and inspectors. Our vehicles have passed inspection with flying colours and have full certification for use.
PHE Radiation Protection
Purpose
 
  1. This document, published by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), specifies HSE´s Criteria of Core Competence for radiation protection advisers (RPAs). The criteria cover both individuals and Bodies that wish to give advice as RPAs. The Statement also includes the specific requirements that Assessing Bodies have to meet to be recognised by HSE for the purpose of assessing the competence of individuals to act as RPAs.
  2. This Statement has been published following a comprehensive review and external consultation that took place during 2005. In addition to correcting administrative details and removing unnecessary barriers to the smooth operation of procedures, this latest version addresses issues raised during the external consultation, in particular clarifying the role of the RPA, requirements in relation to ´practical experience´ and what constitutes ´core competence´. HSE understands from its discussions with a broad range of stakeholders that these changes are broadly welcomed across the Radiation Protection community. HSE is grateful for the number of comments received during the review.
Introduction
  1. The Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive (96/29/Euratom) requires ´qualified experts´ to be involved in specified tasks and additionally requires Member States to recognise the ´capacity to act´ of such experts.
  2. In Britain, the qualified expert in relation to occupational radiation protection is the radiation protection adviser (RPA) in the Ionising Radiations Regulations 2017 (IRR17). All other qualified experts, for example those qualified experts in waste minimisation and monitoring under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 (RSA93), fall outside the scope of this Statement. The role of an RPA is set out in regulation 13(1) and Schedule 5 to the IRR99. Broadly, it is to advise an employer on compliance with IRR99 in work related situations. This includes those radiation protection matters necessary to comply with the Regulations.
  3. The purpose of the recognition procedure described in this Statement is to meet European recognition obligations and to give employers confidence that any person or body recognised as an RPA has core competence in giving advice on compliance with IRR99. An employer who works with ionising radiations is required to appoint and consult an RPA on the matters set out in Schedule 5 of IRR99. In addition, an employer should also consult an RPA on (other matters where advice is needed to comply with IRR99. Those matters are listed in ACoP paragraph 217 (employers should note that the status of an ACoP, unlike regulations, does not require them to follow its advice so long they can demonstrate that adequate compliance has been achieved by alternative means). The employer must select an RPA who, or an RPA body which, has the necessary knowledge and experience to make them suitable to give advice in relation to the employer´s particular line of work and the particular compliance questions to which they require an answer.
  4. Regulation 2 of IRR99 defines an RPA as “an individual who, or a body which, meets such criteria of competence as may from time to time be specified in writing by the Executive". An individual awarded a Certificate of Core Competence from an HSE RPA Assessing Body or holding a Radiological Protection Level 4 National or Scottish Vocational Qualification (N/SVQ) is recognised by HSE as an RPA. The Criteria of Core Competence for an individual RPA are outlined in Part I of Annex 1 of this Statement. A body which meets the Criteria of Core Competence is known as an RPA Body. The Criteria of Core Competence for an RPA Body are outlined in Part II of Annex 1 of this Statement.
  5. This Statement establishes the written criteria of competence referred to in Regulation 2 and contains the following :
    • the HSE Criteria of Core Competence for individuals and bodies intending to give advice as RPAs;
    • the HSE requirements for organisations which undertake the task of assessing individuals against the relevant Criteria of Core Competence (these organisations are referred to in this document as Assessing Bodies).
    Key definitions and terms used within the Statement are included at Annex 4.
Criteria of Core Competence
  1. The HSE Criteria of Core Competence for individuals who wish to act as RPAs are set out in Part I of Annex 1. These Criteria of Core Competence are appropriate for work in all sectors. Applications for recognition by individuals who do not hold a valid N/SVQ should be made to an Assessing Body recognised by HSE for this purpose, not to HSE. Any certificate awarded by an Assessing Body will be valid for no more than 5 years from the date that the certificate is issued, unless an extension to an Assessing Body´s certificates has been agreed by HSE or under the special circumstances in paragraph 12 of Annex 2.
  2. The HSE Criteria of Competence and other requirements for RPA Bodies are set out in Part II of Annex 1. HSE statements of recognition of RPA Bodies will be valid for no more than 5 years from the date of issue unless an extension has been agreed by HSE. Any organisation wishing to act as an RPA Body should apply to HSE with sufficient information to show that it meets these requirements. (Details on how to apply can be found in HSE´s guidance on the Criteria of Core Competence and other requirements for RPA Bodies) Arrangements for HSE assessment of applications for recognition (and renewal of recognition) are set out in Part II of Annex 1. HSE will maintain a publicly available list of all organisations which it has recognised as RPA Bodies, together with contact details. This information, and further guidance on the Criteria of Core Competence for RPA Bodies, may be found on HSE´s website
  3. HSE and Assessing Bodies recognised by HSE will have regard for the principles and approach set out in the Health & Safety Commission´s Enforcement Policy Statement when assessing a person or organisation for recognition as an RPA. HSE will also apply these principles in assessing an organisation´s suitability to be an Assessing Body. In particular, assessment processes and procedures will be proportionate and consistent, HSE and Assessing Bodies will help applicants understand what is expected of them and what they should expect from the HSE or Assessing Body, and there will be effective arrangements for handling complaints.
Assessing Bodies
  1. The purpose of an Assessing Body is to certificate individuals who wish to become or continue to be RPAs under IRR99. An organisation that wishes to be recognised by HSE as an Assessing Body must be able to demonstrate to HSE that it has:
    • schemes in place which meet the requirements set out in Annex 2; and
    • an organisational structure and arrangements capable of ensuring that these schemes continue to meet the requirements.
  2. Organisations wishing to become Assessing Bodies should apply to HSE with sufficient information to show that they meet the requirements set out in Annex 2. HSE will maintain a publicly available list of all organisations it recognises as Assessing Bodies, together with contact details. Arrangements for HSE assessment of applications for recognition as an Assessing Body, and renewal of recognition, are set out in Annex 2. HSE recognition of an Assessing Body will usually be reviewed after 5 years. However, if HSE receives a complaint / allegation about the operation of an Assessing Body this requirement for review may be brought forward.
  3. HSE recognition of organisations as Assessing Bodies will be restricted to the purpose of establishing the RPA core competence requirements for individuals. Assessing Bodies must recognise the certificates of other Assessing Bodies.
Suitable RPAs
  1. Holding a certificate from an Assessing Body (or possessing an appropriate National or Scottish Vocational Qualification) does not, of itself, make the holder a suitable RPA for a particular employer to consult, as required by regulation 13(1), IRR99. It is only recognition of core competence to give advice on compliance with IRR99 including those radiation protection matters necessary to comply with the Regulations. Similarly, a written statement of HSE recognition held by an RPA Body only relates to that organisation´s Core Competence to give advice as an RPA. Employers will need to satisfy themselves that the individual RPA (or RPA body) they appoint also possesses the specific knowledge and experience required for giving advice on their particular working conditions or circumstances, in order to satisfy the test of suitability in regulation 13(1) IRR99. Judgements about such knowledge and experience (and thus suitability) do not form part of the HSE Criteria of Core Competence.
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